Posts Tagged ‘wheel encoders

26
Oct
10

FRC – Sensor basics – Encoder

Sensors are the way the robots interact with the world when not being controlled by the driver. NI has some basic sensor information.
They can also help the driver with operations for control. The basic paradigm for using sensors is Sense Think Act. This link has some good information on the Sense Think Act paradigm.
Think Sense Act means to use the Sensors to sense the world, distance, objects, orientation. Process and integrate the data from the various sensors. And then act on it, move in the direction or do an action based on that data.
The first thing to do is understand the sensors, how they’re used, and how to communicate with them. Some of the easiest sensor communication is digital I/O. Sensors like limit use digital I/O (DIO). The compressor pressure switch also uses DIO. DIO indicates on or off, it’d that simple. From there some thinking has to occur. “Are we at a limit?” “How many times has a DIO turned on?” Things like that.
Another easy to use interface is Analog Input. Analog input measures the input voltage of a sensor. Distance sensors are a good example of how an Analog Input can operate. Some distance sensor output a higher voltage when an object is close and a lower voltage when an object is farther away. The voltage would have to be calibrated to distance. Just note that not all Distance sensors are analog input.
Some sensors have serial communications. This can be a little more complicated than the simple DIO or Analog In data but you can get a lot more information from sensors and data can be sent to the sensor for various reasons.

Blocks for sensor communication

There many different serial communications protocols. A protocol is the process for sending and receiving data. Who sends what, when, and in what order. Serial, I2C, and SPI are two of the protocols supported by the robot code. There are blocks for standard serial communications, I2C communications, and SPI communications in the WPI Robotics library
Each device that uses serial communications has individual commands and responses based on the sensor. The user’s manual should have information on how to communicate.
The WPI Robotics Library has interfaces to most of the sensors used by the FRC robots. This makes it easy to interface with the standard sensors.

In my opinion, one of the more useful sensors are the wheel encoders. There are examples, sample code, and blocks to support them. Encoders can tell how far your robot has moved. It’s based on the number of DIO “ticks” happen. Ticks are each time a DIO line goes high then low. Each tick represents a distance. The number of ticks for a distance is determined by seeing how many ticks it is for one rotation of the wheels and figure the distance traveled with one rotation of a wheel. After that, if you want to go a certain distance, divide the distance to go by wheel rotation distance and multiply by ticks. That will give you the number of ticks it takes to go a distance.
# ticks = (D / Cw) * tick per rotation
D is distance to go
Cw is Circumference of wheel (wheel base)

If you want to turn, you have to have one wheel encoder go more than the other wheel encoder. To do a turn where one side wheels don’t turn and the other turns the robot you need to have the wheel encoders on one side move while the others stay in place.
There is a good encoder example for the encoders that come in the Kit Of Parts. From the LabVIEW opening screen, in the lower right hand corner, there is an examples area. At the bottom of that, there is a “more…” folder. Click on that and look for the encoder example. Below are some pictures of the encoder example.

Encoder example front panel

Encoder example block diagram

On the front panel there is a picture of how to hook up the encoder and a ready to use block diagram for deploying to the robot. Hookup the motor encoder leads according to the picture and then hit the run arrow. This will deploy and run the example. The driver station must also be hooked up over the network, running, and enabled.
Notice in the block diagram there is an open, configure, and start blocks outside the while loop. The encoder get is inside the while loop and so that it will execute over and over. There is a 100 hooked up to a timer which means the loop will execute every 100 ms.
Before you run the code, if you click on the “highlight” execution button, in red above, you can follow the execution.
Encoders are an easy to use sensor that can really help, especially during autonomous mode.
More on sensors next week.

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