31
Jan
11

FRC – Analog and Digital Sensors

Sensors can really help with robot performance. There are several sensors that come in the Kit Of Parts (KOP), limit switches, the encoders (2 kinds), IR sensors (for line following), gyro, camera, and accelerometer. There are several different ways these sensors interface with the computer. Some through communications protocols such as TCP/IP that the camera uses or I2C protocol that some of the Lego Mindstorms sensors use. There’s also a digital interface used by the Quadrature wheel encoder and the limit switches and an analog interface used by the gyro and the magnetic wheel encoder. I’m going to focus on the the two simplest, digital and analog sensor interfaces.

A lot of the analog and digital sensors use a 3 pin interface. There is a ground (minus) and 5 volt (plus) pins to provide power to a device. The third pin is a signal. On the analog input the signal pin accepts voltages between 0 and 10 volts. On the digital input, it accepts a voltage between 0 and 6 volts. If the voltage is above 3.2 volts (I think) a “1” is read and below 3.2 volts a zero is detected.

The Analog bumper is shown but digital side car has the same pin out.

As long as any sensor you have is 5 volt you can wire the 5 volt sensor line to the 5 volt pin on the analog or digital interface, the ground to the GND pin (minus) and the signal line to the SIG pin, the sensor should work. Note that if you get the ground and power lines backwards, the sensor may burn up. In other words, be careful about wiring and look for black spots on the chip or a funny smell after you hook it up.

A sensor that uses a digital interface basically sends an on/off signal. Limit switches are the best example. When the limit switch is closed, a one can be read by the computer. When the switch is open, a zero is read. Limit switches are good for checking the end of a mechanical movement or when something is in place like a scoring piece. The quadrature encoder sends digital signals for each rotation to the digital sidecar. This creates a pulse stream as shown in the diagram. By counting the digital signals, the computer can tell how far the robot has traveled. That’s basically how the LabVIEW encoder blocks work.

Analog sensors send out a voltage that can be measured by the analog module on the robot. Analog sensors such as distance sensors will put out a voltage based on the distance an object is from the sensors, the closer the object the more voltage the sensor puts out. If you know how much voltage is put out per inch, the distance can be figured out by multiplying the distance per inch with the voltage. The gyro puts out a voltage as the gyro is turned.

If you read the data sheet on a sensor it should say if it’s analog or digital, what pin is for power, what pin is for ground and what pin is the signal. Almost any sensor for analog or digital should be able to be used fairly easily. If you have any questions about sensors or about other robot issues you can e-mail me at frc704mentor@qweztech.com. Good luck.

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